Health Care Law - Scam Alert

Many of the provisions of the new health-care law have not yet been implemented, yet a new wave of scans seeking to exploit the uncertain ease of a new health-care law have already begun. State insurance commissioners and attorneys general are warning consumers about these woo often aggressive for scam artists, that are often targeting the elderly. Here are some things that you can do to protect yourself.

One scam involving con artists calling, e-mailing or even showing up at the door to say that under the new law you must have health insurance, otherwise you go to jail. They even go so far as to identify themselves as governmental officials and describe the policies that they’re selling as “ObamaCare” insurance. Since people are often confused and frightened about the impacts of the new law, they many times divulge private information that under normal circumstances they would not.

In fact, the provisions mandating that you obatin health insurance coverage does not begin until 2014 and, even then, would not imposed a criminal penalty. To be certain, there is no “limited enrollment period” which exist and there is no such coverage called “ObamaCare.”

There are a couple ways to protect yourself and your loved ones, especially the elderly, against such scams. First, never purchase an insurance policy without calling your state insurance department to find out whether the policy is legitimate and the seller is licensed. Utilized professionals that you know or who are recommended by friends. Never give out your credit card, bank account or Social Security number to anyone that you don’t know.

The next major scam revolves around the Medicare prescription drug doughnut hole “rebate” checks which just began to be mailed out last month. “Doughnut hole” is the term used for a notorious “gap” in prescription drug coverage under Medicare Part D. In most cases, the plan covers 75 percent of drug costs, up to $2,830. Once seniors hit that limit, they must pay all their own costs until total spending reaches $6,440 in a year.

Federal officials report that scam artists call seniors and other Medicare beneficiaries, telling them they need to provide personal information to get the rebates checks - including their Medicare, Social Security or bank account numbers. However, the checks are being sent out automatically, so any request for information is a con.

There are a couple ways to protect yourself and elderly family members against such scams. First, never purchase an insurance policy without calling your state insurance department to find out whether the policy is legitimate and the seller is licensed. Utilized professionals that you know or who are recommended by friends. Never give out your credit card, bank account or Social Security number to anyone that you don’t know.

closeClose